Vol. 13 - Issue 1 2017 - ISSN 1504-4831
Tuesday, 12 December 2017
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Volume 6 - issue 2 - 2010

Digital storytelling in study abroad: toward a counter-catalogic experience

Karen Rodriguez, of the CIEE Study Center in Guanajuato, Mexico, and Universidad de Guanajuato present the article: “Digital storytelling in study abroad: toward a counter-catalogic experience”. She reports from a pilot project of how students on visits to a foreign university may use digital storytelling to expand their experiences and support their learning. She argues that they are able to dig deeper into the contexts they are approaching and develop critical and dialogic encounters with them.

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Digital storytelling in sex education. Avoiding the pitfalls of building a ‘haram’ website

Pauline Borghuis, Christa de Graaf and Joke Hermes, all of INHolland University have jointly written: “Digital storytelling in sex education. Avoiding the pitfalls of building a ‘haram’ website.” The project reported aimed at providing information about sex and sexuality to groups considered to be vulnerable due to lack of knowledge and cultural barriers. The researchers developed stories with the participants from interviews, and argue for the value of using the approach for a participant design or a “DS light”.

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The Hadia Story: Digital Storytelling in Election Campaigns

Eva Bakøy and Øyvind Kalnes of Lillehammer University College present the article: “The Hadia Story: Digital Storytelling in Election Campaigns”. The paper goes into how a particular Norwegian-Pakistani  Labour politician, Hadia Tajik, has used digital storytelling to construct her political identity, and a discussion of the consequences of her experiments with this genre. During the 2009 electoral campaign she moved from being an unknown politician to becoming a political household name and the only member of the new Parliament with a migrant background. The digital stories were instrumental in this development for numerous reasons, the most important probably being that they gave her prime time television coverage.

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“Don’t Keep It To Yourself!”: Digital Storytelling with South African Youth

Amber Reed, of University of California, Los Angeles, and Amy Hill, Center for digital storytelling, present the article: ““Don’t Keep It To Yourself!”: Digital Storytelling with South African Youth.” This article reviews the success and challenges of the Sonke Gender Justice Network and shows us the potential that thoughtfully designed digital storytelling efforts offer as both a psychological outlet and a tool for community education and social activism with marginalized youth.

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The Pedagogy of Digital Storytelling in the College Classroom

Rachel Raimist, of the University of Alabama, Candance Doerr-Stevens and Walter Jacobs of the University of Minnesota have produced the rich media paper: “The Pedagogy of Digital Storytelling in the College Classroom. “ They report from the process when Raimist and Jacobs collaboratively designed and taught the course “Digital Storytelling in and with Communities of Color” with Candance Doerr-Stevens auditing the class as a graduate student. This article examines the media making processes of the students in the course, asking how participants used digital storytelling to engage with themselves and the media through content creation that both mimicked and critiqued current media messages.

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Meshing the Personal with the Professional: Digital Storytelling in Higher Education

Mary F. Wright and Karen Ryan (University of Wisconsin-River Falls) provide us with the article “Meshing the Personal with the Professional: Digital Storytelling in Higher Education” This paper chronicles a yearlong journey of learning about digital storytelling and leading the creation of five digital stories within a higher education community. The many uses of digital storytelling in higher education are explored as a reflective tool for practice, to highlight academic projects, interests or initiatives, and to simply reflect on how we are shaped by the stories we live and how we in turn share our diverse identities.

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