Vol. 13 - Issue 1 2017 - ISSN 1504-4831
Friday, 15 December 2017

Sharing

Yngve Nordkvelle, editor

editorial imageSeminar.Net is approaching its 10th anniversary. The journal continues to practise a free and open access policy of no costs for contributors. We are still committed to publishing research articles to promote studies on the subject of media in education media in education. We operate in a rapidly changing environment of academic publishing. While conventional newspapers are forced to close and are recreated as online newspapers, academic publishing houses appear to survive such threats of extinction. Traditional media are seeking alternative sources to finance their activities. Academic publishing has quite rightly been accused of squeezing higher education institutions with extortionate costs for journal subscriptions. While the profits gained by the publishing houses have been enormous the costs of doing much editorial work, as well as all peer-reviewing have been graciously covered by higher institution staff without incurring expenses. Open Access publishing has gained much attention lately, and is a great deal more common now than it was in 2005, when Seminar.Net was launched. There are a number of hybrid publishing formats offered to authors, with and without a price tag forwarded to the author. For example, the Norwegian Research Council has recently established a foundation for academic writers who face the challenge of financing publication of an article. All editorial work, including reviewing, of Seminar.net is done in our free time. Copy-editing and language checks are carried out by experts, as well as the technical processing of posting videos and texts on the website. We thank you all for doing this at a reasonable price and with such enthusiastic commitment. This is our way of sharing!

The subject of sharing is at the heart of the majority of the papers in the current issue, the first four of which were presented at a conference at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013. The last paper is an investigation into the matter of how some elderly members of the public resist and refrain from using the Internet.