Seminar.net - 10 years

editorialIn January 2005 we were a group of enthusiastic academics who wanted to publish critical papers about media, technology and lifelong learning. We found a technological platform for publishing journal articles, did the necessary preparatory work for the journal to be registered, referenced and accepted as a formal Norwegian publication. Over the last decade we have published about 100 papers from Australia, Europe, Asia and North America. We have developed the video abstract as a genre and set some standards for open access publishing in Norway. We have collaborated with academics, groups and activists in the field of media education in order to promote new and challenging topics, and have managed, in our own opinion, to publish papers of wide interest and relevance. By using “Seminar.net” as the formal name of the journal, we intended to honor the idea of the seminar, which was first introduced as a teaching method at the university of Halle, in Germany in the late 17th century. The Seminar was a successful method, which opened for the voice of the participants, not only the professors, but for everyone taking part in the discourse.

In this issue we introduce four papers who are all significant contributions to the field.

Old Literacies and the “New” Literacy Studies: Revisiting Reading and Writing

Professor Norm Friesen, currently at the University of British Columbia, discusses the notion of “old” and “new” literacies in his paper “Old Literacies and the “New” Literacy Studies: Revisiting Reading and Writing”. The aim of the paper is to raise critical questions regarding contemporary and dominant theories of “literacies”. Professor Friesen expands the views of literacies with findings from recent archeological research and relates this to the current regime of testing and standardizing literacies in schooling. The paper concludes by “… considering the broad implications of these findings, and of the concomitant normative investment of education to established textual forms and standards.”

Teacher education as design: technology-rich learning environments and trajectories

Professor Andreas Lund, Associate professor Jonas Bakken and associate professor Kirsti Engelien, University of Oslo propose in their article ”Teacher education as design: technology-rich learning trajectories and environments” that student teachers need to be prepared to initiate, design and develop new practices in teaching and learning. The paper examines the challenges that teacher education is facing “…when both the amount of information and its complexity are increasing due to the growing use of technology”. They argue for a richer view of technology than what they find in policy papers and didactic literature. They relate this discussion to a case of how the use of a wiki and testing out a new type of exam might demonstrate how their concept of teacher education as design might prove fruitful.

Philosophical speech act theory and challenges in interactive dialogue: Experiences of narrow communication

Professor Halvor Nordby of Lillehammer University College uses philosophical speech act theory in his article “Philosophical speech act theory and challenges in interactive dialogue: Experiences of narrow communication”. His contribution highlights the problems that remain with producing meaningful and sufficient communication when solving problems in health care. His primary concern is how paramedics communicate and often fail to communicate well with their centres for radio communication. He interprets data from his research on how to improve communicative skills for the training of paramedics.

Comparing the use of computer-supported collaboration tools among university students with different life circumstances

Miikka J. Eriksson is university lecturer at the University of Eastern Finland, and Päivi Rasi and Hanna Vuojärvi are university lecturers at the University of Lapland, Finland. Their article “Comparing the use of computer-supported collaboration tools among university students with different life circumstances” discusses how higher education in Finland deals with the fact that an increasing number of students in higher education integrate their learning activities with various life circumstances such as employment or raising children. Their study aims to compare whether and what kinds of differences exist between the perceived use of synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated communication tools among university students with children or in full-time employment and students without these commitments. They found in their study that students adjust differently to their complex life situations. They suggest that “..pedagogical choices should support different kinds of learning strategies. Students with multiple commitments, and especially students with children, should be encouraged and assisted to create stronger ties with their peers, if they are willing to do so”.

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Monitor 2011 - The digital state of the Norwegian school

Lillian Gran

Department of Education and Social Work
Lillehammer University College
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Review of the national digital survey

A yearly digital survey committed in compulsory school in Norway

Keywords: The Digital condition of the Norwegian compulsory school, motivated students, technology, media, digital natives

Monitor 2011(Egeberg, 2012) is a submission on the fifth quantitative survey of the Norwegian digital health situation completed by Egeberg et al. The survey is a qualified comparison foundation with international surveys on digital competence such as, e.g. PISA. Since 2003, the digital surveys have been completed every other year in Norway to identify indications on schools' digital state. The respondents who were chosen are a selection of school leaders, teachers and student in the 8th and 9th grades and level two in upper secondary school. The submissions research and results are also organized according to these three areas of participants.

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Digital Storytelling, Mediatized Stories: Self-Representations in New Media

Knut Lundby (red.)

Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing, New York, 2008.

Reviewed by
Jill Walker Rettberg
Associate Professor of Digital Culture
University of Bergen
http://jilltxt.net

We live in an age in which more and more of us are creating our own "digital stories". In 2008, 18% of Norwegian 16-24 year olds were recorded as being active bloggers over the previous three months (Statistics Norway, "ICT in households", 2nd quarter 2008) while more than 2/3 of American teenagers have uploaded self-produced material to the Internet, in the form of YouTube videos, photographs, blogs, stories, remixes etc. (Pew Internet). The numbers of these "user-made" cultural productions are growing year by year and spreading from the younger generation to us adults, who are now the group most increasingly represented on Facebook. In blogs and on Facebook the distinction between amateur and professional is largely meaningless.

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Story Circle: Digital Storytelling Around the World.

John Hartley and Kelly McWilliam (eds.)

Publisher: Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009

Reviewed by
Birte Hatlehol
PhD student in Media Education
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
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The anthology Story Circle is an international study of digital storytelling that discusses the phenomenon in a global context. The book contains 20 articles with contributions from a number of key specialists with wide-ranging experience in the field of DST.

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Moving Media Studies - Remediation Revisited

Edited by Heidi Philipsen and Lars Qvortrup

Publisher: Samfundslitteratur Press: Frederiksberg Press, 2007.

Reviewed by
Stephen Dobson
Professor
Lillehammer University College
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Introduction
Two questions can be asked: firstly, not do we need another book on remediation, but why? And secondly, if this is the case, what kind of book should it be? This review spirals around these questions.
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Global perspectives on E-learning.

Rhetoric and reality by A. A. Carr-Chellman (Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2005

Reviewed by
Dr. J. Ola Lindberg
Department of Education, Mid Sweden University
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Dr. Anders D. Olofsson
Department of Education, Umeå University
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It seems suitable to begin this review by giving a brief description of the context in which the texts of this book are produced. If it fails to be regarded as a description, then we hope at least it can be regarded as one possible understanding of the context. When contextualizing a book, a good idea seems to be to start with a few words about the editor, Alison A. Carr-Chellman.
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